Impresión 3D

Although it may sound like a modern term and technology, the truth is that the first construction equipment and materials for 3D printing were developed as early as 1976.

A few years later, in 1981, Hideo Kodama invented two methods of AM fabrication of a three-dimensional plastic model with a photo-hardenable polymer.

In 1984, several projects were presented and patented based on the stereolithography process, which is based on adding layers by curing photopolymers with UV lasers.

In addition, a system was defined for generating three-dimensional objects by creating a pattern of the object to be formed, which gave rise to the STL file format that is widely accepted today for 3D printing.

 

First SLA 3D printing machine

In 1992, the first SLA (stereolithographic) 3D printing machine was developed by the company 3d Systems.

An ultraviolet laser solidified a photopolymer layer by layer to create three-dimensional objects. Although the pieces were not very perfect, it suggested the great potential that this type of machine could offer.

Seven years later, in 1999, a breakthrough was seen with the first lab-grown organ by the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine’s research team through its project to print organs and tissues using 3D printing technology.

First SLS printer

In 2006, the first SLS or selective laser synthesis printer was built. A machine that uses a laser to melt materials during the 3D printing process and that gave great hope for the manufacture of industrial parts, prostheses, etc.  A couple of years later, through the RepRap project, the first printer capable of replicating its own components came to light, making it possible to build identical printers or spare parts.

This type of printing was initially designed to be used almost exclusively for industry, but thanks to this first SLS printer, its use was extended to include models for “domestic” use.

 
Progress and current events

In 2011, engineers at the University of Shouthampton designed a 3D printed drone that was produced in just one week. In the same year, we also saw the first prototype of a car whose bodywork had been created through 3D printing or how this technology was taken to another very different market such as jewellery, even being able to 3D print gold and silver pieces from certain models.

In recent years, we have seen multiple applications in dental implants, bone replacements, and so on. We have even seen how 3D printers have recently been used to manufacture health material to help in the fight against the coronavirus in hospitals, adapters for respirators, etc.

How it works

3D printing requires the use of software, the corresponding hardware of the machine or printer and the materials used for the printing itself, all working together.

The printing process itself involves creating three-dimensional objects by layering them from the bottom up.

Before starting the process, the software divides the graphic into layers as thin as the diameter of the output material.

For each layer, the printer moves on the plane to release material at the corresponding coordinates to form the three-dimensional figure identical to the one designed in 2D.

Therefore, the first thing we need to print an object in three dimensions is a file created with 3D modelling software. The next thing is to use the ideal material for its manufacture. Usually thermoplastic materials are used, but there are also 3D printers capable of using other materials such as metal, resins or polymers.

However, in this case the cost of the printers is much higher as they must be able to melt the material for use in layered printing.

And finally, of course, there is the printer itself, which, as we can already deduce, comes in different types depending, above all, on the material used for 3D printing.

 

3D printing methods

There are different technologies available for

3D printing that differ mainly in the way the different layers are used to create the parts. Some use melting methods to form the layers, such as SLS or FDM, while others deposit liquid materials that are solidified with different technologies. The most commonly used methods include:

  • Injection moulding.
  • Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM).
  • Stereolithography (SLA).
  • Ultraviolet light curing.
  • Photopolymerisation by photon absorption.
  • Ice printing.

 Mateials

Depending on the methods used for 3D printing, we have seen that different materials can be used.

A printer cannot use just any material for printing, but must use one that is compatible with the type of printer and technologies used.

There is a wide variety of materials used for printing objects in three dimensions, from liquid, solid, flexible, transparent, opaque, coloured, etc. materials.

Within this field we offer you the modelling of any object you need to be able to print it in 3D.

We manage the whole process.

Info@nima, visualiza tus ideas…

Infoarchitecture
Design
Animations
Infographics
Almost Any Format
Almost Any Software
3D printing
360 VR - AR
Digital Marketing

3D Printing

Although it may sound like a modern term and technology, the truth is that the first construction equipment and materials for 3D printing were developed as early as 1976.

A few years later, in 1981, Hideo Kodama invented two methods of AM fabrication of a three-dimensional plastic model with a photo-hardenable polymer.

In 1984, several projects were presented and patented based on the stereolithography process, which is based on adding layers by curing photopolymers with UV lasers.

In addition, a system was defined for generating three-dimensional objects by creating a pattern of the object to be formed, which gave rise to the STL file format that is widely accepted today for 3D printing.

 

First SLA 3D printing machine

In 1992, the first SLA (stereolithographic) 3D printing machine was developed by the company 3d Systems.

An ultraviolet laser solidified a photopolymer layer by layer to create three-dimensional objects. Although the pieces were not very perfect, it suggested the great potential that this type of machine could offer.

Seven years later, in 1999, a breakthrough was seen with the first lab-grown organ by the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine’s research team through its project to print organs and tissues using 3D printing technology.

First SLS printer

In 2006, the first SLS or selective laser synthesis printer was built. A machine that uses a laser to melt materials during the 3D printing process and that gave great hope for the manufacture of industrial parts, prostheses, etc.  A couple of years later, through the RepRap project, the first printer capable of replicating its own components came to light, making it possible to build identical printers or spare parts.

This type of printing was initially designed to be used almost exclusively for industry, but thanks to this first SLS printer, its use was extended to include models for “domestic” use.

 
Progress and current events

In 2011, engineers at the University of Shouthampton designed a 3D printed drone that was produced in just one week. In the same year, we also saw the first prototype of a car whose bodywork had been created through 3D printing or how this technology was taken to another very different market such as jewellery, even being able to 3D print gold and silver pieces from certain models.

In recent years, we have seen multiple applications in dental implants, bone replacements, and so on. We have even seen how 3D printers have recently been used to manufacture health material to help in the fight against the coronavirus in hospitals, adapters for respirators, etc.

How it works

3D printing requires the use of software, the corresponding hardware of the machine or printer and the materials used for the printing itself, all working together.

The printing process itself involves creating three-dimensional objects by layering them from the bottom up.

Before starting the process, the software divides the graphic into layers as thin as the diameter of the output material.

For each layer, the printer moves on the plane to release material at the corresponding coordinates to form the three-dimensional figure identical to the one designed in 2D.

Therefore, the first thing we need to print an object in three dimensions is a file created with 3D modelling software. The next thing is to use the ideal material for its manufacture. Usually thermoplastic materials are used, but there are also 3D printers capable of using other materials such as metal, resins or polymers.

However, in this case the cost of the printers is much higher as they must be able to melt the material for use in layered printing.

And finally, of course, there is the printer itself, which, as we can already deduce, comes in different types depending, above all, on the material used for 3D printing.

 

3D printing methods

There are different technologies available for

3D printing that differ mainly in the way the different layers are used to create the parts. Some use melting methods to form the layers, such as SLS or FDM, while others deposit liquid materials that are solidified with different technologies. The most commonly used methods include:

  • Injection moulding.
  • Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM).
  • Stereolithography (SLA).
  • Ultraviolet light curing.
  • Photopolymerisation by photon absorption.
  • Ice printing.

 Mateials

Depending on the methods used for 3D printing, we have seen that different materials can be used.

A printer cannot use just any material for printing, but must use one that is compatible with the type of printer and technologies used.

There is a wide variety of materials used for printing objects in three dimensions, from liquid, solid, flexible, transparent, opaque, coloured, etc. materials.

Within this field we offer you the modelling of any object you need to be able to print it in 3D.

We manage the whole process.

Info@nima, visualiza tus ideas…

Infoarchitecture
Design
Animations
Infographics
Almost Any Format
Almost Any Software
3D printing
360 VR - AR
Digital Marketing
SS. NN.

3D Printing

Although it may sound like a modern term and technology, the truth is that the first construction equipment and materials for 3D printing were developed as early as 1976.

A few years later, in 1981, Hideo Kodama invented two methods of AM fabrication of a three-dimensional plastic model with a photo-hardenable polymer.

In 1984, several projects were presented and patented based on the stereolithography process, which is based on adding layers by curing photopolymers with UV lasers.

In addition, a system was defined for generating three-dimensional objects by creating a pattern of the object to be formed, which gave rise to the STL file format that is widely accepted today for 3D printing.

 

First SLA 3D printing machine

In 1992, the first SLA (stereolithographic) 3D printing machine was developed by the company 3d Systems.

An ultraviolet laser solidified a photopolymer layer by layer to create three-dimensional objects. Although the pieces were not very perfect, it suggested the great potential that this type of machine could offer.

Seven years later, in 1999, a breakthrough was seen with the first lab-grown organ by the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine’s research team through its project to print organs and tissues using 3D printing technology.

First SLS printer

In 2006, the first SLS or selective laser synthesis printer was built. A machine that uses a laser to melt materials during the 3D printing process and that gave great hope for the manufacture of industrial parts, prostheses, etc.  A couple of years later, through the RepRap project, the first printer capable of replicating its own components came to light, making it possible to build identical printers or spare parts.

This type of printing was initially designed to be used almost exclusively for industry, but thanks to this first SLS printer, its use was extended to include models for “domestic” use.

 
Progress and current events

In 2011, engineers at the University of Shouthampton designed a 3D printed drone that was produced in just one week. In the same year, we also saw the first prototype of a car whose bodywork had been created through 3D printing or how this technology was taken to another very different market such as jewellery, even being able to 3D print gold and silver pieces from certain models.

In recent years, we have seen multiple applications in dental implants, bone replacements, and so on. We have even seen how 3D printers have recently been used to manufacture health material to help in the fight against the coronavirus in hospitals, adapters for respirators, etc.

How it works

3D printing requires the use of software, the corresponding hardware of the machine or printer and the materials used for the printing itself, all working together.

The printing process itself involves creating three-dimensional objects by layering them from the bottom up.

Before starting the process, the software divides the graphic into layers as thin as the diameter of the output material.

For each layer, the printer moves on the plane to release material at the corresponding coordinates to form the three-dimensional figure identical to the one designed in 2D.

Therefore, the first thing we need to print an object in three dimensions is a file created with 3D modelling software. The next thing is to use the ideal material for its manufacture. Usually thermoplastic materials are used, but there are also 3D printers capable of using other materials such as metal, resins or polymers.

However, in this case the cost of the printers is much higher as they must be able to melt the material for use in layered printing.

And finally, of course, there is the printer itself, which, as we can already deduce, comes in different types depending, above all, on the material used for 3D printing.

 

3D printing methods

There are different technologies available for

3D printing that differ mainly in the way the different layers are used to create the parts. Some use melting methods to form the layers, such as SLS or FDM, while others deposit liquid materials that are solidified with different technologies. The most commonly used methods include:

  • Injection moulding.
  • Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM).
  • Stereolithography (SLA).
  • Ultraviolet light curing.
  • Photopolymerisation by photon absorption.
  • Ice printing.

 Mateials

Depending on the methods used for 3D printing, we have seen that different materials can be used.

A printer cannot use just any material for printing, but must use one that is compatible with the type of printer and technologies used.

There is a wide variety of materials used for printing objects in three dimensions, from liquid, solid, flexible, transparent, opaque, coloured, etc. materials.

Within this field we offer you the modelling of any object you need to be able to print it in 3D.

We manage the whole process.

Info@nima, visualiza tus ideas…

Infoarchitecture
Design
Animations
Infographics
Almost Any Format
Almost Any Software
3D printing
360 VR - AR
Digital Marketing
SS. NN.

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