Animations

What is 3D animation?

3D animation is the process of placing characters and objects in 3D space and manipulating them to create the illusion of movement. Objects are made from 3D models assimilated in a digital environment using 3D modelling tools. Real-life objects can also be scanned into a computer and converted into blueprints for 3D animated objects.

The goal of 3D animators is to move the objects and characters in a given scene as realistically as possible. They can create the perfect cartoon character, but if their movements are clumsy, uneven or robotic, all their work will go down the drain.

That’s why animators spend a lot of time studying the basics of movement to make their animations believable.

Did you notice how fluid and realistic every movement of the 3D characters in the example above looks?

Even though the story takes place in an animated world, it is still compatible with the physics of our world, at least for the most part.

Differences between 3D and 2D animation

The very names themselves give away the difference between 3D animation

and 2D, but let’s go a little deeper into this topic to show the difference in the creation processes.

2D animation is flat, as it is based on a two-dimensional plane with x and y axes.

Think Pinocchio, the original Aladdin and The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Rick and Morty… we could go on and on.

With the help of an additional axis, 3D adds a perception of depth to the animations, making them more realistic.

Source: 3D Ace

2D animation achieves movement through the rapid succession of 2D scenes, each one minimally different from the previous one. 3D animation is done by creating 3D models and manoeuvring them in a three-dimensional environment.

The addition of a third axis gives more room to move and arrange objects in a scene, making character animation more flexible.

The 3D animation process

Let’s move on to the more practical part: how is 3D animation done? Pre-production is not very different from 2D animation.

It starts with developing a storyline and storyboard, sketching the 3D characters, creating the background designs and laying the groundwork for the production process.

The whole animation process is quite complex and nuanced, but here are the main stages.

Modelling

Before we can have a working scene with characters and interactions, we first have to build our 3D objects.

As mentioned above, objects are based on 3D computer models. A basic model is a 3D mesh consisting of points, lines and curves arranged in such a way that the object is mapped. A computer sees the models as pure geometric shapes.

It is not until colours and textures are added that the map of the object comes to life.

Baby Groot 3D model

Source: Free3D

But before the character can move, he needs a controllable skeleton, just like humans and animals. Rigging is the process of producing that skeleton. Once the skeleton is formed, the 3D model (also called skin) is attached to the rig so that the character is ready to be animated.

Scene composition and animation

Once the 3D characters are ready, it is time to place them in their respective scenes and animate their movements with 3D animation software.

The first stages of the animation process are very rough; movements and transitions are jerky and unnatural.

This rough first draft is achieved because animators first create the initial and final poses for any movement.

These poses are known as keyframes.

Lighting, camera work (the choice of angles and depth of a shot), effects and other details are added much later to produce the final, smooth animation we see on our screens.

Rendering

The last part of the animation production process is rendering.

This is when the animation is finalised and exported. This step requires great attention to detail to ensure that the final rendering is polished.

The rendering process is the most time-consuming in the whole project.

Info@nima offers you a multitude of animation solutions to present your ideas in the most impactful way for your clients. Nowadays, video is the most visual attraction we can have in our digital spaces.

Contact us without any kind of commitment, to find out more about your needs or ideas, deadlines and prices…

Infoarchitecture
Design
Animations
Infographics
Almost Any Format
Almost Any Software
3D printing
360 VR - AR
Digital Marketing

Animations

What is 3D animation?

3D animation is the process of placing characters and objects in 3D space and manipulating them to create the illusion of movement. Objects are made from 3D models assimilated in a digital environment using 3D modelling tools. Real-life objects can also be scanned into a computer and converted into blueprints for 3D animated objects.

The goal of 3D animators is to move the objects and characters in a given scene as realistically as possible. They can create the perfect cartoon character, but if their movements are clumsy, uneven or robotic, all their work will go down the drain.

That’s why animators spend a lot of time studying the basics of movement to make their animations believable.

Did you notice how fluid and realistic every movement of the 3D characters in the example above looks?

Even though the story takes place in an animated world, it is still compatible with the physics of our world, at least for the most part.

Differences between 3D and 2D animation

The very names themselves give away the difference between 3D animation

and 2D, but let’s go a little deeper into this topic to show the difference in the creation processes.

2D animation is flat, as it is based on a two-dimensional plane with x and y axes.

Think Pinocchio, the original Aladdin and The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Rick and Morty… we could go on and on.

With the help of an additional axis, 3D adds a perception of depth to the animations, making them more realistic.

Source: 3D Ace

2D animation achieves movement through the rapid succession of 2D scenes, each one minimally different from the previous one. 3D animation is done by creating 3D models and manoeuvring them in a three-dimensional environment.

The addition of a third axis gives more room to move and arrange objects in a scene, making character animation more flexible.

The 3D animation process

Let’s move on to the more practical part: how is 3D animation done? Pre-production is not very different from 2D animation.

It starts with developing a storyline and storyboard, sketching the 3D characters, creating the background designs and laying the groundwork for the production process.

The whole animation process is quite complex and nuanced, but here are the main stages.

Modelling

Before we can have a working scene with characters and interactions, we first have to build our 3D objects.

As mentioned above, objects are based on 3D computer models. A basic model is a 3D mesh consisting of points, lines and curves arranged in such a way that the object is mapped. A computer sees the models as pure geometric shapes.

It is not until colours and textures are added that the map of the object comes to life.

Baby Groot 3D model

Source: Free3D

But before the character can move, he needs a controllable skeleton, just like humans and animals. Rigging is the process of producing that skeleton. Once the skeleton is formed, the 3D model (also called skin) is attached to the rig so that the character is ready to be animated.

Scene composition and animation

Once the 3D characters are ready, it is time to place them in their respective scenes and animate their movements with 3D animation software.

The first stages of the animation process are very rough; movements and transitions are jerky and unnatural.

This rough first draft is achieved because animators first create the initial and final poses for any movement.

These poses are known as keyframes.

Lighting, camera work (the choice of angles and depth of a shot), effects and other details are added much later to produce the final, smooth animation we see on our screens.

Rendering

The last part of the animation production process is rendering.

This is when the animation is finalised and exported. This step requires great attention to detail to ensure that the final rendering is polished.

The rendering process is the most time-consuming in the whole project.

Info@nima offers you a multitude of animation solutions to present your ideas in the most impactful way for your clients. Nowadays, video is the most visual attraction we can have in our digital spaces.

Contact us without any kind of commitment, to find out more about your needs or ideas, deadlines and prices…

Infoarchitecture
Design
Animations
Infographics
Almost Any Format
Almost Any Software
3D printing
360 VR - AR
Digital Marketing
SS. NN.

Animations

What is 3D animation?

3D animation is the process of placing characters and objects in 3D space and manipulating them to create the illusion of movement. Objects are made from 3D models assimilated in a digital environment using 3D modelling tools. Real-life objects can also be scanned into a computer and converted into blueprints for 3D animated objects.

The goal of 3D animators is to move the objects and characters in a given scene as realistically as possible. They can create the perfect cartoon character, but if their movements are clumsy, uneven or robotic, all their work will go down the drain.

That’s why animators spend a lot of time studying the basics of movement to make their animations believable.

Did you notice how fluid and realistic every movement of the 3D characters in the example above looks?

Even though the story takes place in an animated world, it is still compatible with the physics of our world, at least for the most part.

Differences between 3D and 2D animation

The very names themselves give away the difference between 3D animation

and 2D, but let’s go a little deeper into this topic to show the difference in the creation processes.

2D animation is flat, as it is based on a two-dimensional plane with x and y axes.

Think Pinocchio, the original Aladdin and The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Rick and Morty… we could go on and on.

With the help of an additional axis, 3D adds a perception of depth to the animations, making them more realistic.

Source: 3D Ace

2D animation achieves movement through the rapid succession of 2D scenes, each one minimally different from the previous one. 3D animation is done by creating 3D models and manoeuvring them in a three-dimensional environment.

The addition of a third axis gives more room to move and arrange objects in a scene, making character animation more flexible.

The 3D animation process

Let’s move on to the more practical part: how is 3D animation done? Pre-production is not very different from 2D animation.

It starts with developing a storyline and storyboard, sketching the 3D characters, creating the background designs and laying the groundwork for the production process.

The whole animation process is quite complex and nuanced, but here are the main stages.

Modelling

Before we can have a working scene with characters and interactions, we first have to build our 3D objects.

As mentioned above, objects are based on 3D computer models. A basic model is a 3D mesh consisting of points, lines and curves arranged in such a way that the object is mapped. A computer sees the models as pure geometric shapes.

It is not until colours and textures are added that the map of the object comes to life.

Baby Groot 3D model

Source: Free3D

But before the character can move, he needs a controllable skeleton, just like humans and animals. Rigging is the process of producing that skeleton. Once the skeleton is formed, the 3D model (also called skin) is attached to the rig so that the character is ready to be animated.

Scene composition and animation

Once the 3D characters are ready, it is time to place them in their respective scenes and animate their movements with 3D animation software.

The first stages of the animation process are very rough; movements and transitions are jerky and unnatural.

This rough first draft is achieved because animators first create the initial and final poses for any movement.

These poses are known as keyframes.

Lighting, camera work (the choice of angles and depth of a shot), effects and other details are added much later to produce the final, smooth animation we see on our screens.

Rendering

The last part of the animation production process is rendering.

This is when the animation is finalised and exported. This step requires great attention to detail to ensure that the final rendering is polished.

The rendering process is the most time-consuming in the whole project.

Info@nima offers you a multitude of animation solutions to present your ideas in the most impactful way for your clients. Nowadays, video is the most visual attraction we can have in our digital spaces.

Contact us without any kind of commitment, to find out more about your needs or ideas, deadlines and prices…

Infoarchitecture
Design
Animations
Infographics
Almost Any Format
Almost Any Software
3D printing
360 VR - AR
Digital Marketing
SS. NN.

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